Sarita and Nuumaqamis Open to Bivalve harvesting

The subareas 23-4, to 23-6, and 23-10 are open to manila clams, littleneck clams, oysters and mussels only, closed to all other bivalve shellfish.

Marine Biotoxin – Toxins that are produced by certain species of naturally occurring microscopic algae that bloom under favourable conditions. Filter-feeding bivalve shellfish accumulate the toxins when they ingest toxic algae as a food source. The consumption of toxic shellfish can lead to illness and even death. The toxins do not kill the shellfish nor cause any discernible changes in the appearance, smell or taste of shellfish that would alert consumers of toxicity. As conditions (e.g., water temperature, salinity, and nutrient levels) become less favourable, the algae bloom subsides and with time, shellfish rid themselves of toxin and are once again safe to eat.

For more information on Marine Biotoxin and Sanitary Contamination Closures, go to Fisheries and Oceans Canada.

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“Indigenous Public Safety and Policing Forum” was a step toward change for indigenous peoples

The Assembly of First Nations (AFN) Indigenous Public Safety and Policing Forum took place on March 30th,  in Regina, Saskatchewan, bringing together more than 80 delegates and speakers, including AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde and The Honourable Ralph Goodale, Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness.

“This forum brought together many of the parties required to create justice systems that work for our people and communities,” said AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde.  “I am encouraged by the many community driven approaches underway.  Our people will continue to lead the way in developing creative solutions built upon our traditional values and First Nations justice systems with a goal of improving public safety and policing for First Nations and others across Canada.”

“Undertaking this meaningful conversation with our Indigenous and public safety partners on issues related to gaps in  services in the criminal justice system, community safety and policing is a step in the right direction toward fulfilling the Government of Canada’s commitment to a renewed relationship with Indigenous Peoples,” said Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Minister Ralph Goodale.

The Forum featured discussions on Gaps in Services in the Criminal Justice System; Community Safety Plans and Protocols; Policing; and connections to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action.  There was a commitment from the federal government to renew, support and, based on direction from First Nations, revise where necessary the First Nations policing Program.

The Forum brought together Indigenous organizations, federal and provincial policing organizations and other organizations to begin a dialogue on working towards improved public safety and policing for Indigenous communities and people.  Participants included representatives from the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, the Métis National Council, the Native Women’s Association of Canada, the RCMP, Office of the Correctional Investigator, First Nation Chiefs of Police, the Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations, the Indigenous Bar Association, Correctional Services Canada and others.

The Assembly of First Nation is the national organization representing First Nation citizens in Canada.  Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Comms, @AFN_Updates and visit the AFN website at www.afn.ca.

First Nations Leaders Call for Safety, Equality, Respect to Mark International Women’s Day

(Ottawa, ON):  Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde, together with Regional Chief Shane Gottfriedson and AFN Women’s Council Chair Therese Villeneuve, today marked International Women’s Day by Canadians to celebrate the success of Indigenous women in Canada, and honour them by ensuring their safety, education and equality.

“Today we celebrate the many essential contributions women make at the centre of our families and our communities,” said AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde.  “Our relationships with our mothers, sisters, aunts and daughters are sacred and they must be respected.  Today we celebrate the success of Indigenous women across Canada and we honour them by committing to their safety, education, employment and equality wherever they reside.”

 

Women

International Women’s Day is acknowledged annually March 8.  It celebrates social, political and economic achievements of women while focusing world attention on areas requiring further action.  This year’s international theme is focused on gender parity.

“First Nations women still have many challenges ahead of us in terms of equality and equity at all levels, whether it be among First Nation governments, provincial or federal,” said Okanese First Nation Chief Marie-Anne Day Walker-Pelletier who is the longest serving female Chief in Canada.  “Efforts must be made to promote, provide and support upper level management and political opportunities for First Nations women.”

“Indigenous women in Canada should have access to the same opportunity as every other Canadian – male or female,” said AFN Women’s Council Chair Therese Villeneuve.  “The AFN women’s council supports and promotes Indigenous women in leadership roles in our communities and across the country.  We celebrate our sisters who are thriving in their homes and family units and in business and high level careers.  Every role must be respected and every woman and young girl must be supported to fulfil their dreams for success.”

International Women’s Day follows the second National Roundtable on missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls which last month brought together Indigenous families, leaders and federal, provincial, territorial leaders to set priorities to address and prevent violence.

“Safety and security for Indigenous women and girls is an urgent priority that requires immediate attention and long-term, coordinated action that will address head-on the vulnerabilities that lead to violence,” said AFN Regional Chief Shane Gottfriedson who leads efforts in the area of justice and addressing violence against Indigenous women and girls.  “There is no quick fix or easy answer, but with the appropriate investments in shelters, day cares, education and housing (just to name some), we will be able to better achieve safety and better support success.”

For more information on work toward a national action plan to address and prevent violence against women and girls and the upcoming 2016 National Roundtable please visit:  http://www.afn.ca/index.php/en/policy-areas/i-pledge.-end-violence.

The Assembly of First Nation is the national organization representing First Nation citizens in Canada.  Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Comms, @AFN_Updates.

For more information please contact:

Jenna Young Castro AFN Communications Officer
613-241-6789, ext. 401; 613-314-8157 or jyoung@afn.ca

Alain Garon AFN Bilingual Communications Officer
613-241-6789, ext. 382; 613-292-0857 or agaron@afn.ca

Attend the B.C. Young Aboriginal Fishers Conference!

The Native Fishing Association (NFA) is pleased to invite you to attend the first annual BC Young Aboriginal Fishers to be held on January 26-28, 2016 at the Radisson Hotel, in Richmond, BC.

This conference is for active fishermen under 40/45 years old that are trying to build fishing careers and/or fishers that have experience on a vessel and are looking at becoming more involved in the industry. So, share this with your family and friends.

Conference Focus

The conference will bring together fishermen from around the province with the goal of creating a space to network with peers and share information about ways to build successful and diversified fishing operations to navigate today’s changing industry. The NFA would also like to receive input and guidance from you on how government programs are working and where we, as a community-based organization, can best put our resources to support you.

Agenda

The Agenda is being developed based on feedback that the Native Fishing Association (NFA) received from interviews with some young fishermen. The conference will focus on the opinions and ideas of early-career fishermen like yourself through panel and peer group discussions. The participants will:

  • Meet and discuss with fellow peers ways in which to diversify fishing skills and experiences
  • Discuss interests, reflections, and/or concerns regarding the industry.
  • Work together to build partnerships and/or economies of scale.

Registration and travel reimbursement 

Please contact the NFA if you are interested in attending at 604-913-2997 or reception@shoal.ca

They invite you to consider first any agencies that might be able to support your travel costs for this professional development opportunity. Huu-ay-aht has some funding available through the Education department. If there are none, the Native Fishing Association have travel reimbursement applications available now. Please feel free to contact Natasha at 604-913-2997 or licencebank@shoal.ca for more information.

Head Office: Suite 110-100 Park Royal South, West Vancouver, BC V7T 1A2
Tel: 604-913-2997 Fax: 604-913-2995

Prince Rupert Branch: Tel: 250-624-3888 Fax: 1-888-652-5077
www.nativefishing.ca

Huu-ay-aht First Nations efforts
Larry Johnson, President of the Nuu-chah-nulth Seafood Development Corporation (NSDC),  and  Annie Merritt, our Employment and Training Policy Analyst, are working with a group of other local organizations to develop and promote an Aboriginal Apprenticeship in Commercial Fishing program this year. There will be a full article on the upcoming program in our next issue of Uyaqḥmis.

 

 

 

Huu-ay-aht featured in Douglas magazine

Honouring the past, exploring the future. Councillor John Alan Jack “admits that mentioning First Nations in a room full of business executives might conjure up anti-business obstructionism stereotypes. But these are old, increasingly inaccurate perceptions, says the 33-year-old elected Huu-ay-aht councillor, part of a vanguard of young Aboriginal leaders working hard to show that First Nations can stay true to cultural roots while being progressive in business.”

 Read the full article here Douglas_First Nations IMG_5631