Listen to your Elders about “The Heart of the People”!

This is the first part of the documentary “The Heart of the People”.  A unique opportunity to listen to Elders who are no longer with us, but speak about the Sarita River from the bottom of their tiičma (heart):

  • Willie Sport – cultural historian, fisher and trapper.
  • Lizzie Happynook – weaver whose pieces are exhibited at the Alberni Valley Museum.
  • Peter Joe – boat builder and former resident of the area.
  • Annie Clappis – member of the Huu-ay-aht Community Language Speakers.

You can also understand the history around the Specific Claims Tribunal of the Huu-ay-aht
First Nations regarding the value of the compensation Canada owes the Nation as a result of the way timber on former Numukamis IR1 was sold to MacMillan Bloedel in the 1940s. Forester Consultant Herb Hammond talks about how, in his opinion, the hemlock looper was used at that time as an excuse to log indiscriminately.

 

Register now for the First Responders Program in Anacla

The Bamfield/Anacla First Responder Training Program will take place from April 25 to 30, 2016. The community expressed an interest in developing First Responder capacity recently. So, at this time, committed candidates are needed to fill 18 available spots .

Please note that nine of the spots are reserved for Huu-ay-aht Citizens, as per the Nations’ funding requirements. This five-day course will take approximately seven hours per session, with breaks for lunch and coffee. Food and beverages are going to be provided. There is a written and practical examination on the final day.

This is a great opportunity being delivered by the Nation, in partnership with the Justice Institute of B.C. (JIBC), as the first step in potentially offering a series of courses in Anacla that would ladder up to paramedic training in the long run. In the short term, it helps to build capacity to handle emergencies in the area.

Registration:
Amelia Vos – Environmental Technician
amelia.v@huuayaht.org
Phone: 250.728.3414, Ext. 119

Learn more about Culturally Modified Trees through this video!

“Sacred Cedar: The Cultural and Archaeological Significance of Culturally Modified Trees” is a report of the Pacific Salmon Forests Project and the David Suzuki Foundation, written by Arnoud H. Stryd and Vicki Feddema. It explains that First Nations have utilized cedar for at least 3,000 years.  Wood- and bark-working tools found in archaeological sites helped discover this.

The following video features the CMT that lays in Anacla near the entry to Pachena Bay. The intro states that “thousands of years ago, when the Huu-ay-aht people fished, hunted and carved their history into the cedar trees overlooking the Pacific Ocean, theirs were the only human voices. They had no idea that, one day, a giant ant would descend from the sky, pick up a chunk of one of those cedars and deliver it to their village…” Find out more about this story here:

The Language Revitalization Planning Program 2016-2017 is now open for applications

The First Peoples’ Cultural Council is pleased to announce that the Language Revitalization Planning Program (LRPP) is now accepting applications for the 2016-2017. The LRPP supports communities that share the same language to collaboratively develop strategic language plans. The LRPP provides funding to hire a part-time Language Planning Specialist and to conduct multiple inter-community meetings to support the development of a collaborative, multi-community language strategy. B.C. First Nations communities and organizations are eligible to submit proposals.

Application deadline: Friday, April 29, 2016 at 4 pm.

Program description

Application Form

Applications may be emailed to Aliana Parker  aliana@fpcc.ca or faxed to 250-652-5953.

For more information, please call 250-652-5952

 

Celebrate National Aboriginal Language Day

Since 1993, Indigenous peoples in Canada have celebrated March 31st to honour the strength and endurance of our languages and cultures. While National Aboriginal Languages Day is a single day to honour the legacy we have inherited, there are thousands of Indigenous Language Champions creating and delivering Indigenous languages programs and traditional teachings every day. We celebrate the work of our Indigenous Language and Culture Champions to revitalize and seek ways to sustain survival of our languages.

We acknowledge the difficult burden they have carried to reverse more than a century of attempts, primarily through residential schools, to erase our languages and identity. Twenty-seven years ago, the Indigenous peoples of Hawai’i had only 50 surviving fluent speakers. Today, their education system supports Language Nests and Immersion Programs. Their language and culture is taught in all grade levels, and into college and university programs – from early childhood education to PhD. They now have more than 10,000 fluent Hawaiian speakers. It is our legacy, as our Hawaiian and Maori brothers and sisters have done, to sustain the struggle to ensure that our communities have equality of opportunity to live and learn in our Mother Tongues – to have access to Language Nests, Immersion Programs, Language and Cultural Camps, and to offer Master-Apprentice Programs for our Teachers and those who want to become fluent speakers and Language Teachers.

From coast to coast to coast, we will take action with even greater determination to assert our languages, our identities, and to seek equitable recognition and support to that which is provided to the official languages in this country. Together, let us agree that all learners will have equality of opportunity to live and learn in our Mother Tongue. Join us in celebrating National Aboriginal Languages Day, every day!