Invitation to parents, grandparents, foster parents and Caregivers

Panel seeks citizen input for Huu-ay-aht solution.

Huu-ay-aht wishes to develop “Made-in-Huu-ay-aht” solutions that will help keep our children safe, happy, healthy, and connected to their Huu-ay-aht families and culture. An independent, four-member panel has been appointed to explore and recommend changes and improvements to child and family services for Huu-ay-aht families.

The panel has respectfully requested that Huu-ay-aht citizens meet with them to share stories and experiences. The panel needs to hear and learn from our people and from all caregivers for our children to understand what is working and what is not working for Huu-ay-aht children and families.

The Panel wishes to hear from us about:

  • You or your families experiences with child and family services,
  • Stories you have been told that guide or anchor a Huu-ay-aht way of caring for children and families,
  • Your thoughts and ideas about how to bring our children home and keep them safe, happy, healthy, and connected to our Huu-ay-aht culture.

The panel is open to meeting in whatever way people feel safe and comfortable to discuss these important issues, for example, with individuals privately and confidentially, with family groups, and in community gatherings.

The panel will also be available to meet in a variety of locations (e.g. Anacla, Port Alberni, Nanaimo, Vancouver). For those who prefer to provide input to the panel in writing please send your written comments to the panel at the email address below.

The first community gathering with the panel will be:  

Sunday             and             Monday
January 15                          January 16
12 to 5 p.m.                         9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

At the Cedar Wood Lodge, 5895 River Road, Port Alberni, B.C.

Meeting Materials 

Agenda

Community Services section of the Strategic Plan

Everyone who has information to share is encouraged to come. Please contact the panel at hfnpanel@gmail.com.

Historic moment as Councillor John Jack named regional district chair

The Alberni‐Clayoquot Regional District (ACRD) Board of Directors elected Director John Alan Jack as Chairperson of the ACRD Board for 2017.

Director Jack has represented the Huu‐ay‐aht First Nations on the Board since their treaty government joined as a voting member in 2012. This is the first time in history a formal First Nation representative has served as Chair on a Regional District Board in British Columbia. Director John Alan Jack is a third-term councillor with the Huu‐ay‐aht First Nations, a member to the Maa‐nulth Treaty, which grants his community self‐government, ownership, and authority over land, as well as access and control over resources.

Director Josie Osborne, the Mayor of the District of Tofino, was elected Vice‐Chair of the Board for 2017. Osborne served as Chair of the Board for the past two years. She decided not to seek re‐election of Chairperson for a third term.

“In the past years, the Alberni‐Clayoquot Regional District has led the way in pursuing meaningful reconciliation with First Nations. We will continue down that path in a focused and respectful manner,” Jack explained. “I look forward to seeking and creating new opportunities in cooperation with and for the benefit of all in the region.”

Investment in Bamfield by Huu-ay-aht appreciated by residents

In late January, the Nation purchased 11 properties in the Bamfield area. It took a lot of hard work to close the sale and even more to get the turnkey operations open and ready to accept visitors.

On April 23, 2016, Huu-ay-aht First Nations invited its citizens, dignitaries, and residents of Bamfield to join them in a celebration to mark this accomplishment.

The event exceeded all expectations, filling the Rix Centre for Ocean Discoveries for the luncheon and a large crowd gathered at The Hotel for singing, dancing, and a ribbon cutting. It was a chance for Huu-ay-aht to thank everyone involved in making it happen and welcome the community. It was also an opportunity for people in attendance to hear Huu-ay-aht’s vision for the future.

Following this successful event, Tayii Ḥaw̓ił ƛiišin (Derek Peters) and Elected Chief Councillor Robert J. Dennis Sr. received the following letter and a photo collage from the day. He wanted to share it with the community.

The letter follows:

Gentlemen,

I have been meaning to congratulate you both on your ribbon-cutting ceremony on April 23.

Bamfield needed a fresh start and you have been doing a wonderful job of being that catalyst and including the whole community in your plans.

Growing up in Bamfield in the 1950s and early 60s, I have watched the gradual decline of our community – first with the commercial fishing demise and then the stagnation of so much of the commercial property.

I feel a hope for Bamfield again, which I have not had for some time. 

Best regards and the best of luck on your venture,

Marc Phillips

 

 

Listen to your Elders about “The Heart of the People”!

This is the first part of the documentary “The Heart of the People”.  A unique opportunity to listen to Elders who are no longer with us, but speak about the Sarita River from the bottom of their tiičma (heart):

  • Willie Sport – cultural historian, fisher and trapper.
  • Lizzie Happynook – weaver whose pieces are exhibited at the Alberni Valley Museum.
  • Peter Joe – boat builder and former resident of the area.
  • Annie Clappis – member of the Huu-ay-aht Community Language Speakers.

You can also understand the history around the Specific Claims Tribunal of the Huu-ay-aht
First Nations regarding the value of the compensation Canada owes the Nation as a result of the way timber on former Numukamis IR1 was sold to MacMillan Bloedel in the 1940s. Forester Consultant Herb Hammond talks about how, in his opinion, the hemlock looper was used at that time as an excuse to log indiscriminately.

 

Learn more about Culturally Modified Trees through this video!

“Sacred Cedar: The Cultural and Archaeological Significance of Culturally Modified Trees” is a report of the Pacific Salmon Forests Project and the David Suzuki Foundation, written by Arnoud H. Stryd and Vicki Feddema. It explains that First Nations have utilized cedar for at least 3,000 years.  Wood- and bark-working tools found in archaeological sites helped discover this.

The following video features the CMT that lays in Anacla near the entry to Pachena Bay. The intro states that “thousands of years ago, when the Huu-ay-aht people fished, hunted and carved their history into the cedar trees overlooking the Pacific Ocean, theirs were the only human voices. They had no idea that, one day, a giant ant would descend from the sky, pick up a chunk of one of those cedars and deliver it to their village…” Find out more about this story here: