Invitation to parents, grandparents, foster parents and Caregivers

Panel seeks citizen input for Huu-ay-aht solution. Huu-ay-aht wishes to develop "Made-in-Huu-ay-aht" solutions that will help keep our children safe, happy, healthy, and connected to their Huu-ay-aht families and culture. An independent, four-member panel has been appointed to explore and recommend changes and improvements to child and family services for Huu-ay-aht families. The panel has … Continue reading Invitation to parents, grandparents, foster parents and Caregivers

Historic moment as Councillor John Jack named regional district chair

The Alberni‐Clayoquot Regional District (ACRD) Board of Directors elected Director John Alan Jack as Chairperson of the ACRD Board for 2017. Director Jack has represented the Huu‐ay‐aht First Nations on the Board since their treaty government joined as a voting member in 2012. This is the first time in history a formal First Nation representative … Continue reading Historic moment as Councillor John Jack named regional district chair

Investment in Bamfield by Huu-ay-aht appreciated by residents

In late January, the Nation purchased 11 properties in the Bamfield area. It took a lot of hard work to close the sale and even more to get the turnkey operations open and ready to accept visitors. On April 23, 2016, Huu-ay-aht First Nations invited its citizens, dignitaries, and residents of Bamfield to join them … Continue reading Investment in Bamfield by Huu-ay-aht appreciated by residents

Listen to your Elders about “The Heart of the People”!

This is the first part of the documentary "The Heart of the People".  A unique opportunity to listen to Elders who are no longer with us, but speak about the Sarita River from the bottom of their tiičma (heart): Willie Sport - cultural historian, fisher and trapper. Lizzie Happynook - weaver whose pieces are exhibited at the Alberni … Continue reading Listen to your Elders about “The Heart of the People”!

Learn more about Culturally Modified Trees through this video!

"Sacred Cedar: The Cultural and Archaeological Significance of Culturally Modified Trees" is a report of the Pacific Salmon Forests Project and the David Suzuki Foundation, written by Arnoud H. Stryd and Vicki Feddema. It explains that First Nations have utilized cedar for at least 3,000 years.  Wood- and bark-working tools found in archaeological sites helped discover this. The following video features the CMT that lays in Anacla … Continue reading Learn more about Culturally Modified Trees through this video!